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Many of these expressions cross over from the business world to the ‘everyday’ social context, but many are overused and have become cliché while some are still relevant. Cliché = an expression so overused that it has become trite, timeworn, lost its original power. Examples: “I'm so hungry I could eat a horse.” or "Dead as a doornail."

 

Lookout for:

Idiotic

Idioms

Get your ducks in a row

Barking up the Wrong Tree
The Pot calling the Kettle Black

Hit or Miss

A fish out of water

Over a Barrel

In a pickle

Rock in a Hard Place

In a heartbeat

Grunt work

A run for your money

Pull a fast one

That's the way the cookies crumble

Get while the gettin' is good

Six of one, half a dozen of the other

The circular file

Can I take a rain check?

Comes with the territory

You don’t know the half of it.

Bang for the buck

Until the cows come home

Had a cow

Deer in headlights

Raining Cats & Dogs

A fly on the wall

Pulling your leg

Break a leg

Not gonna happen

Up in the air

Water under the bridge

Egg on your face

In the heat of the moment

Cut from the same cloth

Slower than Molasses
Putting the cart before the horse
Low hanging fruit
Ball park figure
Somebody dropped the ball on this one
Hypothetically speaking
Worse case scenario

Feeling under the weather

No Brainer

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket

Get a grip
Business buzzwords:

Bandwidth (metaphor)

Strategic Fit

Gap Analysis

Best Practice

Bottom Line

Revisit

Hardball

Out of the Loop

Benchmark

Value-Added

Proactive

Fast Track

Result-Driven

Empower or Empowerment

Knowledge Base

Total Quality or Quality Driven

Touch Base

Mindset

Client Focused

Ball Park

Game Plan

Leverage

Fast Track

Off Line

Return on Investment

Drill Down

Touch Base

Recap

Partner (v)

Team Player

Change Management

Pushback

Circling the drain

Optics - image, perception, view, impression

knock 'em dead

Break a leg

Missing the boat

Don't look a gift horse in the mouth

Shoot the Breeze

Slim Pickings - in short supply

Ruffled feathers

Dialoguing with the marketplace
Raising the bar
Going to the next level
Paradigm

Synergy

Your mileage may vary

Win-Win

Think Outside the Box

Multitask or Multitasking

At the end of the day

Wow Factor

Liase

Traction

Actionable

Value-added

Win-Win

 

Cliché - An expression so overused that it has become trite, timeworn, lost its original power.

Examples: “I'm so hungry I could eat a horse.”  Or "…dead as a doornail."

 

Others:

Get the ball rolling

Nip it in the bud

Get the show on the road

Pulling some strings

Strings attached

Grass is always greener

Throw your weight around

Roll up your Sleeves

Can of Worms

Pandora's Box

Turn over a new Leaf

Bull in a China shop

Loose Cannon

Go Postal / Go Ballistic

missing the boat

wishy-washy
wiggle-room

par for the course

spare tire

chopped liver

 

Talk to the hand

My bad

Not!

 

 

 


 

"Indioms":

  • Don't break your head over it.
  • Don't mind me pulling legs.
  • The book has dogs ears.
  • I can't able to make it out.
  • Leave the chappals.

Just because it's in the dictionary doesn't mean it should be used.

He was "felicitated".Main Entry: felicitate
Function: transitive verb

  1. archaic : to make happy

  2. a: to consider happy or fortunate b: to offer congratulations to

Inflated Language:

Thank you for evincing interest to engage in an assignment for us. This mail bears reference to our telephonic conversation earlier today. I acknowledge that I’m behind schedule in sending you this communication, and beseech you to accept my sincerest contrition for having kept you waiting.

Please accept my sincere commiserations for your indisposition. I hope your health will return to normalcy expeditiously.


Odd phrases / words

I'll cut short it

Ring up me

Intimate

Inclucate

Get over (end)

Over (dead, out of stock, etc.)

He passed out last year

 

 

ONE WORD?
upto
atleast
maybe
Thankyou
goingforth
eventhough

 

TWO WORDS?
Wel Come
May be
Air Port
Week end
to-day
to-morrow
feed back
hope fully
tress passing